Monthly Archives: September 2016

SOLAS where to look

Navsregs>SOLAS

  A quick handy guide to the SOLAS Chapters

 DSCF3260

As a quick pause in the certificates handy guides here is a quick handy guide to the SOLAS chapters. SOLAS is the top level legislation for the majority of the Maritime safety  related subjects so knowing what it contains in ‘big handfuls’ is useful knowledge.

What is the full name for SOLAS?

The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974solas

 Its aim is to promote safety of life at sea.

When was it implemented?

Adoption: 1 November 1974; entry into force: 25 May 1980

Click here for the IMO SOLAS page>

IMO

“The SOLAS Convention in its successive forms is generally regarded as the most important of all international treaties concerning the safety of merchant ships. The first version was adopted in 1914, in response to the Titanic disaster, the second in 1929, the third in 1948, and the fourth in 1960. The 1974 version includes the tacit acceptance procedure – which provides that an amendment shall enter into force on a specified date unless, before that date, objections to the amendment are received from an agreed number of Parties.” IMO Website 2016

 Click here for a poster showing the link between the Titanic and SOLAS on the IMO website>

titanic

The SOLAS chapters with a summary of some of their contents

Chapter I – General Provisions

  • Surveys
  • Certification
  • Port state controlLoadlines

Chapter II-1 – Construction: Structure, Subdivisions and Stability, Machinery and Electrical Installations

  • Subdivision
  • Pumping arrangements
  • Stability requirements
  • Essential systems

Chapter II-2 – Construction: Fire Protection, Fire Detection and Fire img_20160915_072700_hdr.jpgExtinction

  • Fire zones
  • Fire boundaries
  • Fire detection
  • Means of escape
  • Access for fire-fighting
  • Fire extinguishing appliences

Chapter III – Life-Saving Appliances

  • Lifeboatswp-1473672238644.jpg
  • Rescue boats
  • Lifejackets

Chapter IV – Radiocommunications

  • GMDSS
  • EPIRBSimg_20160915_071815_kindlephoto-118812233.jpg
  • SARTS

Chapter V – Safety of Navigation

  • Metrological services
  • Ice patrol services
  • Routeing Search and rescue
  • Distress
  • VDRs
  • AIS

Chapter VI – Carriage of Cargoes and Oil Fuels

  • Stowage and securing of cargoimg_20160302_070228_pan.jpg

Chapter VII – Dangerous Goods

  • Part A Dangerous goods in package form
  • Part B Dangerous chemicals in bulk
  • Part C    Liquefied gases in bulk

Part D Radioactive substances

Chapter VIII – Nuclear Ships

Chapter IX – ISM

  • ISM code

Chapter X – High-Speed Craft

  • HSC code

Chapter XI-1 – Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Safety

  • Authorisation of organisations
  • Enhanced surveys
  • Ship identification numbers
  • Port state control

Chapter XI-2 – Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Security

  • ISPS codeWharfs
  • Ship alert system
  • Port facilities
  • Control of ships in port

Chapter XII – Additional Safety Measures for Bulk Carriers

  • Structural requirements for bulk carriers

Chapter XIII – Verification of Compliance

  • IMO member state audit schemewpid-wp-1440485717071.jpeg

Chapter XIV-Safety measures for ships operating in polar waters

      • The Polar Code


Click here for information about the Really Handy Revision guides>

 

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

SOLAS Form R-A handy guide to its contents

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Form R

Listing the radio equipment

Attached to each Safety Radio Certificate for cargo ships should be a Form R, a form that lists the radio communications equipment held on board. This post is a quick guide to the contents of that form, contents that give an indication of the range of equipment covered by a cargo ship’s radio safety survey. 

Particulars of ship  

  • Name
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Minimum number of persons with required qualifications to operate the radio installations

Details of radio facilities

Primary systems 

  •  VHF radio installation
  • DSC encoder
  •  DSC watch receiver
  •   Radiotelephony
  • MF radio installation
  • DSC encoder
  • DSC watch receiver
  • Radiotelephony
  • MF/HF radio installation
  •  DSC encoder
  •  DSC watch receiver
  •  Radiotelephony
  •  Direct-printing telegraphy
  • Inmarsat ship earth station

Facilities for reception of maritime safety information 

  • EGC receiver
  • NAVTEX receiver
  • HF direct-printing radiotelegraph receiver

Secondary means of alerting

  • Satellite EPIRB
  • COSPAS–SARSAT
  • VHF EPIRB
  •  Ship’s search and rescue locating device
  •  Radar search and rescue transponder (SART)
  • AIS search and rescue transmitter (AIS-SART)

Methods used to  ensure  availability of  radio  facilities  (regulations  IV/15.6 and  15.7) 

  • Duplication  of  equipment
  • Shore-based  maintenance
  • At-sea maintenance capability

Tagged , ,

Safety Radio Certificate for Cargo Ships- a handy guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Cargo Ship Radio Certificate

Raising the alarm

The last of the trio of SOLAS cargo ship safety certificates is the subject of this post,  the Safety Radio Certificate.

Why is it required?

It is required by SOLAS Chapter 1  regulation 9 – Surveys of Radio Installations of Cargo Ships.

The details of requirements for equipment is contained in SOLAS Chapter IV – Radiocommunications.

Which ships require it?

Cargo ships of 300 gross and above.

What information does it contain?

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • Sea areas in which ship is certified to operate (regulation IV/2)
  • IMO Number
  • Date on which keel was laid or ship was at a similar stage of construction or, where applicable, date on which work for a conversion or an alteration or modification of a major character was commenced
  • Completion date of the survey on which this certificate is based

What does it certify?

  • That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/9 of the Convention.
  • That the survey showed that:
    • The ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards radio installations
    • The functioning of the radio installations used in life-saving appliances complied with the requirements of the Convention.
  • That an Exemption Certificate has/has not been issued.

What form should be attached?

A Record of Equipment for the Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate (Form R)

What Surveys are required?

  • An initial survey before the ship is put in service;
  • A renewal survey at intervals specified by the Administration but not exceeding five years
  • A periodical survey within three months before or after each anniversary date of the Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate

Some useful links

UK MGN 392 Radio survey service authorisation

ITU itu

IMO SOLAS webpage  IMO

INMARSAT  GMDSS web pageinmarsat

For information about the Really Handy Book range of revision aids, click here>

Tagged , , , ,

Cargo ship safety equipment certificate-A record of equipment (Form E)

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Form E

The SEC extra information

Added to the cargo ship safely equipment certificate is a document that is of great use to ship’s personnel preparing for surveys. This is Form E, a form that lists the equipment the surveyor will be looking for. This post is a summary of the equipment listed on the form. 

Details of life-saving appliances

Lifeboats

  • Total number of persons for which life-saving appliances are provided
  • Total number of davit launched lifeboats
  • Total number of persons accommodated by them
  •  Number of self-righting partially enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/431)
  • Number of totally enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/31 and LSA Code, section 4.6)
  • Number of lifeboats with a self-contained air support system (regulation III/31 and LSA Code, section 4.8)
  •  Number of fire-protected lifeboats (regulation III/31 and LSA Code, section 4.9)
  •  Other lifeboats
  • Total number of free-fall lifeboats
  • Total number of persons accommodated by them
  •  Number of motor lifeboats (included in the total lifeboats)
  •  Number of lifeboats fitted with searchlights
  •  Number of rescue boats
  •  Number of boats which are included in the total lifeboats

Liferafts

  • Number of persons accommodated by them
  • Those for which approved launching appliances are not required
  • Those for which approved launching appliances are required Number of liferafts

Other LSA

  •  Number of lifebuoys
  •  Number of lifejackets
  •  Immersion suits
  •  Total number
  • Number of suits complying with the requirements for lifejackets
  • Number of anti-exposure suits

Radio installations used in life-saving appliances

  •  Number of search and rescue locating devices
  • Radar search and rescue transponders (SART)
  •  AIS search and rescue transmitters (AIS-SART)
  • Number of two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus

Details of navigational systems and equipment

Compasses

  • Standard magnetic compass
  •  Spare magnetic compass
  • Gyro-compass
  •  Gyro-compass heading repeater
  • Gyro-compass bearing repeater
  •  Heading or track control system
  • Pelorus or compass bearing device
  • Means of correcting heading and bearings
  • Transmitting heading device (THD)

Charts and publications

  • Nautical charts/Electronic chart display and information system (ECDIS)
  • Back-up arrangements for ECDIS
  • Nautical publications
  • Back-up arrangements for electronic nautical publications

Position fixing

Receiver for a global navigation satellite system/terrestrial radionavigation system

Radar

  •  9 GHz radar
  • Second radar (3 GHz/9 GHz3)
  • Automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA)
  • Automatic tracking aid
  • Second automatic tracking aid
  • Electronic plotting aid

Other navigation systems

  •  Automatic identification system (AIS)
  • Long-range identification and tracking system
  • Voyage data recorder (VDR)
  • Simplified voyage data recorder (S-VDR)
  • Speed and distance measuring device (through the water)
  • Speed and distance measuring device (over the ground in the forward and athwartships direction)
  • Echo-sounding device
  • Rudder, propeller, thrust, pitch and operational mode indicator
  • Rate-of-turn indicator
  •  Sound reception system
  •  Telephone to emergency steering position
  • Daylight signalling lamp
  •  Radar reflector
  • International Code of Signals
  •  IAMSAR Manual, Volume III
  • Bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS)

 

Tagged , , , ,

Cargo ship safety equipment certificate- A handy guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate

The SEC, ensuring a ship has the correct safety equipment

What does the Cargo Ship Safety equipment Certificate cover?

  • Fire safety systems
  • Life saving appliances
  • Navigational equipment
  • Pilot embarkation arrangements
  • Nautical publications
  • Lights and shapes
  • Sound signals
  • Distress signals

Why is it required?

SOLAS chapter Regulation 8 – Surveys of Life-Saving Appliances and other Equipment of Cargo Ships.
Which ships require the certificate?

Cargo ships of 500 gross tons or more on international voyages.

What does the certificate signify?

  •  That  the  ship  has  been  surveyed  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  regulation  I/8  of  SOLAS
  •  The  ship  complied  with  the  requirements  of  the  Convention  as  regards  fire  safety  systems and appliances and fire control plans
  •  The  life-saving  appliances  and  the  equipment  of  the  lifeboats,  liferafts  and  rescue boats were provided in accordance with the requirements of the Convention
  • The  ship  was  provided  with  a  line-throwing  appliance  and  radio  installations  used  in  lifesaving appliances in accordance with the requirements of the Convention
  • The  ship  complied  with  the  requirements  of  the  Convention  as  regards  shipborne navigational equipment, means of embarkation for pilots and nautical publications
  • The  ship  was  provided  with  lights,  shapes  and  means  of  making  sound  signals  and  distress signals  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  the  Convention  and  the  International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea in force
  • The ship complied  in all other respects the ship complied with the relevant requirements of the Convention

 

What details are found on the certificate?



Particulars of the ship

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • Deadweight of ship (metric tons)
  • Length of ship
  • IMO Number

Type of ship

  • Bulk carrier
  • Oil tanker
  • Chemical tanker
  • Gas carrier
  • Cargo ship other than any of the above


Build details

  • Date of building contract
  • Date on which keel was laid or ship was at similar stage of construction
  • Date of delivery
  • Date on which work for a conversion or an alteration or modification of a major character
  • was commenced (where applicable)


Dates of inspections and survey

  • Date of survey
  • Dates of last two inspections of the outside of the ship’s bottom
  • Endorsement for annual and intermediate surveys
  • Endorsement for inspections of the outside of the ship’s bottom

 


 

What additional document is held with the certificate?

A record of equipment. This lists the number of LSA items carried, and is a useful document for preparing for survey.

See UK The Merchant Shipping (Survey and Certification) Regulations 2015

What surveys are required to maintain the certificate?

 

  • An initial survey before the ship is put into service
  • A renewal survey-Maximum of 5 years
  • An intermediate survey- within three months before or after the second or third anniversary date of a Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate
  • An annual survey- within three months before or after each anniversary date of the ship’s Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate
  • Inspections of the ship’s bottom- two inspections of the ship’s bottom to take place out of the water within any five year period, and at intervals not exceeding 36 months.


 

A good reference is the UK’s MSN 1751 Harmonised System of Survey and Certification (HSSC)

What equipment is covered in a survey?

LSA

  • Lifeboats, davits and winches
  • Inflatable boats
  • Rescue boats
  • Liferafts
  • Lifejackets
  • Immersion suits and TPAs

Distress signals

  • Rockets and signals
  • Hand held VHFs
  • EXPIRBs
  • SARTs
  • Signal lantern

Navigational equipment

  • Echo sounder
  • Gyro compass
  • Magnetic compass
  • Sound signals
  • Shapes
  • Navigational lights

Fire fighting

  • Fire control plans
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Fixed fire systems
  • IG systems
  • Fireman’s outfits
  • Fire detection and alarm system

Power

  • Emergency controls
  • Emergency power supply

Miscellaneous

  • Stability data
  • Pilot ladder

 


For information about the Really Handy Book range of revision aids, click here>

 

Tagged , , , , ,

The Maritime labour Certificate- A handy guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Maritime Labour Certificate

The MLC-Protecting the crew’s working conditions

Why us it required?

The Maritime Labour Convention, 2006  issued by the International Labour Organisation.

For UK guidance see MGN 470

What ships require the certificate?

Ships of 500 GT or over, engaged in international voyages.

What information is contained on the document?

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number of letters
  • Port of registry
  • Date of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • IMO number
  • Type of ship Name and address of shipowner

What does it certify?

That the ship has been inspected and verified to be in compliance with the requirements of the international labour convention.

What other document must be attached to the certificate?

A Declaration of maritime labour compliance

How long is the certificate valid?

For a maximum of five years

What inspections are required?

A renewal inspection every five years

An intermediate inspection, if the certificate is five years, it shall take place between the second and third anniversary dates of the certificate.

What areas are covered by an inspection?

  • Minimum age
  • Medical certification
  • Qualifications of seafarers
  • Seafarers’ employment agreements
  • Use of any licensed or certified or regulated private recruitment and placement
    service
  • Hours of work or rest
  • Manning levels for the ship
  • Accommodation
  • On-board recreational facilities
  • Food and catering
  • Health and safety and accident prevention
  • On-board medical care
  •  On-board complaint procedures
  • Payment of wages

What does the Declaration of maritime labour compliance state?

That the national requirements implementing the Convention, setting out the measures adopted by the shipowner to ensure compliance.

What are the two parts of the Declaration of maritime labour compliance?

  • Part I :Drawn up by the competent authority (Flag state)
  • Part II: Drawn up by the shipowner

What is contained within part 1 of the Declaration of maritime labour compliance?

  • Identify the list of matters to be inspected
  • Identify the national requirements embodying the relevant provisions of the
    Convention.
  • Refer to ship-type specific requirements under national legislation
  • Record any substantially equivalent provisions adopted
  • Clearly indicate any exemption granted by the competent authority

What is contained within part II of the Declaration of maritime labour compliance?

The measures adopted to ensure ongoing compliance with the national requirements between inspections and the measures proposed to ensure that there is continuous improvement.

For more information

Seafarer’s Rights website

UK’s MGN 1848 Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 Survey and Certification of UK Ships


To learn more about ‘The Really Handy’ range of study aids for OOW examinations- click here>

Tagged , , , ,

Cargo Ship Safety Certificates- A Really Handy Guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Cargo Ship Safety Certificates

And now this blog moves on to some of the certificates covering vessel safety. 

Keeping the vessel safe

These certificates cover the most important elements of Cargo vessel safety. Cargo ships have two methods of achieving this certification, each method having different certificates.

What are the two options of cargo ship safety certification?

1. Separate certificates covering:

2. A combined Cargo Ship Safety Certificate covering all three areas

Passenger ships certification will be covered in a later post.

Why are these required?

They are required by SOLAS chapters II-1, II-2, III, IV and V

The Cargo ship safety construction certificate

What does the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate cover?

The structure, machinery and equipment of the ship , other than items included in the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and a Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate.

Why is it required?

SOLAS chapter 1 regulation 10 and 12solas

Which ships require the certificate?

Cargo ships of 500 gross tons or more on international voyages.

What does the certificate signify?

That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/10 of SOLAS.

That the survey showed that the condition of the structure, machinery and equipment as defined in the regulation was satisfactory and the ship complied with the relevant requirements of chapters II-1 and II-2 of the Convention, other than those relating to fire safety systems and appliances and fire control plans.

What details are found on the certificate?

Particulars of the ship

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • Deadweight of ship (metric tons)
  • IMO Number

Type of ship

  • Bulk carrier
  • Oil tanker
  • Chemical tanker
  • Gas carrier
  • Cargo ship other than any of the above

Build details

  • Date of building contract
  • Date on which keel was laid or ship was at similar stage of construction
  • Date of delivery
  • Date on which work for a conversion or an alteration or modification of a major character
  • was commenced (where applicable)

Dates of inspections and survey

  • Date of survey
  • Dates of last two inspections of the outside of the ship’s bottom
  • Endorsement for annual and intermediate surveys
  • Endorsement for inspections of the outside of the ship’s bottom

See UK The Merchant Shipping (Survey and Certification) Regulations 2015

What surveys are required to maintain the certificate?

  • An initial survey before the ship is put into service
  • A renewal survey-Maximum of 5 years
  • An intermediate survey- within three months before or after the second or third anniversary date of a Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate
  • An annual survey- within three months before or after each anniversary date of the ship’s Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate
  • Inspections of the ship’s bottom- two inspections of the ship’s bottom to take place out of the water within any five year period, and at intervals not exceeding 36 months.

A good reference is the UK’s MSN 1751 Harmonised System of Survey and Certification (HSSC)

What is covered in a renewal survey?

  • Structure
  • Boilers
  • Other pressure vessels
  • Main and auxiliary machinery including steering gear and associated control systems, electrical installation and other equipment
  • In the case of tankers, the pump-rooms, cargo, bunker and ventilation piping systems and associated safety devices
  • Required stability information is provided

The survey confirms that all of these are in as satisfactory condition and are fit for the service for which the ship is intended.

What do the intermediate and annual survey consist of?

An intermediate survey includes an inspection of the above to ensure that they remain satisfactory for the service for which the ship is intended.

An annual survey will include a general inspection of the above to ensure that they have been maintained to conform with the provisions of the relevant regulations to ensure that the ship in all respects will remain fit to proceed to sea without danger to the ship or persons on board, and that they remain satisfactory for the service for which the ship is intended.

Must the bottom inspection be conducted in a dry dock?

Consideration may be given to alternate inspections being carried out with the ship afloat using alternative methods.

The next post will cover the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

 

Tagged , , ,

The Safe Manning Document- A handy guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Safe Manning Document

This post series now moves on to the certificates related to manning the ship.

dscf3338

The minimum needed to man the ship

What is it?

The safe manning is a document issued by the flag state that listing the numbers and qualifications required to man the ship.

Why is it needed?

It is required by SOLAS  Chapter V, Regulation 14 Ship’s manning.

“1. Contracting Governments undertake, each for its national ships, to maintain, or, if it is necessary, to adopt, measures for the purpose of ensuring that, from the point of view of safety of life at sea, all ships shall be sufficiently and efficiently manned.

2. For every ship to which chapter I applies, the administration shall:

.1 establish appropriate minimum safe manning following a transparent procedure, taking into account the relevant guidance adopted by the organization*; and

.2 issue an appropriate minimum safe manning document or equivalent as evidence of the minimum safe manning considered necessary to comply with the provisions of paragraph 1.”

The relevant UK legislation is  the Merchant Shipping (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping) Regulations 2015, SI 2015/782,

The related UK M notice is MSN 1868 (M) Standards of Training, Certification & Watchkeeping Convention: UK Requirements for Safe Manning and Watchkeeping

What does it contain?

Ships details

  • Name
  • Port of registry
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • IMO number
  • Gross tonnage
  • Main propulsion power
  • Type and trading area
  • Whether or not the machinery space is unattended and company as defined in the ISM Code

Table of personnel required

  • Numbers
  • Grades
  • Capacities
  • Any special conditions or other remarks

Limitations

  • Ship particulars
  • Service

Issue  details

  • Date of issue
  • Expiry date
  •  Signature and the seal of the Administration.

Reference: IMO  Resolution A.1047(27) Adopted on 30 November 2011 (Agenda item 9) PRINCIPLES OF MINIMUM SAFE MANNING

How is it issued?

A manning submission in submitted to the vessel’s flag state by the company giving its manning proposals. This proposals must demonstrate compliance with STCW  78 for safe manning.

How are the qualifications defined?

Through the STCW Regulation and paragraph.

Here is a table of those Regulations:

Master and deck department
Officer in charge of a navigational watch on any ship on voyages not limited to near-coastal voyages Regulation II/1, paragraph 2
Master or chief mate on a ship of 3000 GT or more Regulation II/2, paragraph 2
Master on a ship of between 500 GT and 2999 GT not engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/2, paragraph 4
Chief mate on a ship of between 500 GT and 2999 GT Regulation II/2, paragraph 4
Officer in charge of a navigational watch on a ship of less than 500 GT engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/3, paragraph 4
Master on a ship of less than 500 GT engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/3, paragraph 6
Engine department
Officer in charge of an engineering watch in a manned engine-room, or designated duty engineer officer in a periodically unmanned engine-room, on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 750 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/1, paragraph 2
Chief engineer officer or second engineer officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 3000 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/2, paragraph 2
Chief engineer officer and second engineer officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of between 750 and 3000 kilowatts propulsion power Regulation III/3, paragraph 2
Electro-technical officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 750 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/6, paragraph 2

Other sources of information

UK Guidance on SOLAS chapter V

IMO Safe manning page

IMO STCW page



To learn more about ‘The Really Handy’ range of study aids for OOW, Mates and Master’s examinations- click here>

wpid-wp-1435845850653.jpegwpid-wp-1435870651939.jpegwpid-wp-1438952970550.jpegwpid-wp-1413749871155.jpegwpid-wp-1438952984722.jpegwp-1448917864372.jpeg

 

Tagged , , ,

International load line Certificate-A Handy Guide

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Load Line Certificate

This series continues exploring the realm of ship certification with another document that defines a vessel.

Wharfs

Defining how deep a vessel can load-The Load Line Certificate

Why is it needed?

It is required by the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966

“(1) An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) shall be issued to every ship, the gross and net tonnages of which have been determined in accordance with the present Convention.”

Click here for the Treaty’s IMO page>IMO

By UK law The Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998

Explained within  UK’S MSN 1752

What ships need one?

Ships engaged on international voyages

Except:

  • Ships of war
  • Ships of less than 24 metres (79 feet) in length;
  • Pleasure yachts not engaged in trade;
    Fishing vessels.

How is it obtained?

After an initial survey before the ship is put in service, which shall include a complete inspection of its structure and equipment in so far as the ship is covered by Convention. The survey shall be such as to ensure that the arrangements, materials and scantlings fully comply with the requirements of the the International Convention on Load Lines.

How is it maintained?

By a periodical survey not exceed five years, to ensure that the structure, equipment, arrangements, materials and scantlings fully comply with the requirements of the Convention.

And an  inspection within three months either way of each annual anniversary date of the certificate, to ensure that alterations have not been made to the hull or superstructures which would affect the calculations determining the position of the load line.

What is looked during the annual inspection?

The effective condition of fittings and appliances for:

  • Protection of openings
  • Guard rails
  • Freeing ports
  • Means of access to crew’s quarters

What is contained on the certificate?

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive Number of letters
  • Port of Registry
  • Length
  • Gross Tonnage
  • Type of ship
  • Freeboards ( from deck line) and load lines assigned for:
    • Winter North Atlantic
    • Winter
    • Summmer
    • Tropical
  • Date of survey
  • Any Conditions
  • Endorsement of annual Survey
LLcert

Example of load line certificate from MSN 1752. Reproduced under Open Government Licence V3

What other document is found with the load line certificate?

The record of particulars relating to conditions of assignment.

What information is contained within the records of particulars?

Tables with details of the following (Where they apply to superstructures, exposed machinery casings and deckhouses protecting openings in freeboard and superstructure decks):

  • Doors
  • Hatchways
  • Machinery space openings
  • Ventilators
  • Air pipes
  • Cargo ports ans similar openings
  • Scuppers, inlets discharges
  • Side scuttles
  • Freeing ports
  • Protection of the crew
  • Timber deck cargo fittings
  • Other special features

Loadlines

How is the freeboard determined?

The treaty contains tables based on the length of the ship and type. These tables give the basic freeboard, which is then adjusted for several factors freeboard to give the summer freeboard. The other seasonal  freeboards are calculated based on the summer value.

 


 

 

Tagged , , ,

What is the International Tonnage Certificate?

Navsregs>Ship Certification>Tonnage Certificate
DSCF3305

The first posts in this series covered certification that identified a ship, the next group of posts cover those that define a ship.

Defining the size of a ship

What is it?

A certificate stating the Gross and net tonnages of a ship.

Why is it needed?

It is required by the International Convention on Tonnage measurement of Ships 1969.

Gross tonnage is used to determine which regulations apply to which ships and Net tonnage is often used to determine the size of harbor and canal dues.

The UK legislation is The Merchant Shipping (Tonnage) Regulations 1982

What is gross and net tonnages?

Gross tonnage is a the measure of the overall size of a ship. It is derived from a formula that multiplies the internal volume of a ship in cubic metres by a constant (K) contained in a table in the tonnage convention.

Net tonnage is the measure of the useful capacity of a ship determined in accordance with the Convention. It is also derived from multiplying the internal volume by the constant K, but then multiplies it by the square of 4 x  ships summer moulded summer draft/3 x moulded depth.  An additional factor is used for passenger ships.

For information on the IMO website click here>IMO

What ships does it apply to?

Ships engaged on international voyages, but not to ships of war and ships of less than 24 meters in length.

What is contained on the certificate?

Front page

  • Name of Ship
  • Distinctive Number or Letters
  • Port of Registry
  • Date
  • Length
  • Breadth
  • Moulded depth amidships
  • The Gross and net tonnages

Rear page

A table showing the spaces included within the tonnage. The table lists for each space:

  • Name
  • Location
  • Length

When is it Issued?

On build or alteration after a tonnage survey has been conducted.

What are the Suez and Panama tonnages?

These are issued on behalf of the canal authorities. The canals use a different measurement system from the international certificate, and the certificate is not mandatory, unless the vessel intends to use the canals. Most ships are issued with the certificates on build.

Panamacanal

Information from the Panama Canal website>

Suezcanal Information from the  Suez Canal website>


For information about the Really Handy Book range of revision aids, click here>

Tagged , ,
Advertisements