Category Archives: ISPS

Port Security Plan-A Quick Guide

​Continuing with the Security theme here is a Handy set of notes on Port Security Plans.

​What requires a port security plan to be developed and mantained?

Part 16 of ISPS code.

Note: The PSP must be based on a port facility security assessment and  be approved by the Government in whose territory the port facility is located.

What should the plan address?

  • Weapons-Measures designed to prevent weapons, dangerous substances and devices intended for use against persons, ships or ports and the carriage of which is not authorised, from being introduced into the port facility or on board a ship;
  • Access -Measures designed to prevent unauthorised access to the port facility, to ships moored at the facility, and to restricted areas of the facility;
  • Threat-Procedures for responding to security threats or breaches of security, including provisions for maintaining critical operations of the port facility or ship/port interface;
  • Instructions-Procedures for responding to any security instructions issued by the  Government in whose territory the port facility is located;
  • Evacuation– Procedures for evacuation in case of security threats or breaches of security
  • Duties-Duties of port facility personnel assigned security responsibilities and of other facility personnel on security aspects;
  • Interface-Procedures for interfacing with ship security activities;
  • Review -Procedures for the periodic review of the plan and updating;
  • Reporting -Procedures for reporting security incidents;
  • Port Security Officer-Identification of the port facility security officer including 24-hour contact details;
  • Information Security– Measures to ensure the security of the information contained in the plan;
  • Cargo Security -Measures designed to ensure effective security of cargo and the cargo handling equipment at the port
  • Audit-Procedures for auditing the port facility security plan;
  • Response-procedures for responding in case the ship security alert system of a ship at the port facility has been activated; 
  • Leave-procedures for facilitating shore leave for ship’s personnel or personnel changes, as well as access of visitors to the ship including representatives of seafarers welfare and labour organizations.

    What format may the Port Security Plan be in?

    • It may be kept in an electronic format;
    • It may be combined with, or be part of,  other port emergency plan or plans;
    • It may cover more than oneport facility if the operator, location, operation, equipment, and design of these port facilities are similar and the Government approves.

    Note: The plan shall be protected from unauthorized access or disclosure.If in an electronic format it shall be protected by procedures to prevent its unauthorized deletion, destruction or amendment.


    A Really Handy Guide to Ship Certification-Part 3

    Keeping vessels safe

    Cover of the Really handy Guide to Ship Certification, part 3.

    The third book of the series on vessel certification covers the SOLAS and security certificates, including SAFCON, CSSC, PSSC, ISPS and a diversion into the subject of HSSC.

    Click here for the book’s Amazon page>

     

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    SOLAS and Maritime Security

    Portsmouth Commercial Harbour panoramaAfter its delve into the Polar Code the Navregs blog now changes focus to explore Maritime Security. It follows on from previous posts based on the International Ship Security Certificate; delving deeper and looking wider.

     

    A Handy Reference to SOLAS Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Security

    Previous Navregs  Maritime Security Related  Posts

    What SOLAS chapter  Chapter makes the ISPS code mandatory?

    XI-2 – Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Security

    Note: ISPS stands for The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities.

    What does SOLAS Chapter XI-2 Cover?Railings

    • Regulation 1 – Definitions
    • Regulation 2 – Application
    • Regulation 3 – Obligations of Contracting Governments with Respect to Security
    • Regulation 4 – Requirements for Companies and Ships
    • Regulation 5 – Specific Responsibility of Companies
    • Regulation 6 – Ship Security Alert System
    • Regulation 7 – Threats to Ships
    • Regulation 8 – Master’s Discretion for Ship Safety and Security
    • Regulation 9 – Control and Compliance Measures
    • Regulation 10 – Requirements for Port Facilities
    • Regulation 11 – Alternative Security Agreements
    • Regulation 12 – Equivalent Security Arrangements
    • Regulation 13 – Communication of Information

    What does SOLAS chapter XI apply to?

    • The following types of ships engaged on international voyages:
    • Passenger ships, including high-speed passenger craft;
    • Cargo ships, including high-speed craft, of 500 gross tonnage and upwards;
    • Mobile offshore drilling units.

    And

    • Port facilities serving such ships engaged on international voyages.

    Governments shall decide the extent of application of the chapter to those port facilities Ship and harbour cranes which, although used primarily by ships not engaged on international voyages, are required, occasionally, to serve ships arriving or departing on an international voyage.

    The chapter does not apply to warships, naval auxiliaries or other ships owned or operated by a Contracting Government and used only on Government non-commercial service.

    A selection of definitions from the Chapter

    Ship/port interface

    The interactions that occur when a ship is directly and immediately affected by actions involving the movement of persons, goods or the provisions of port services to or from the ship.

    Port facility

    A location, as determined by the Contracting Government or by the Designated Authority, where the ship/port interface takes place. This includes areas such as anchorages, waiting berths and approaches from seaward, as appropriate.

    Ship to ship activity

    Any activity not related to a port facility that involves the transfer of goods or persons from one ship to another.

    Security incident

    Any suspicious act or circumstance threatening the security of a ship, or of a port facility or of any ship/port interface or any ship to ship activity.

    Security level

    The qualification of the degree of risk that a security incident will be attempted or will occur.

    Declaration of security

    An agreement reached between a ship and either a port facility or another ship with which it interfaces specifying the security measures each will implement.

    Recognized security organization

     An organization with appropriate expertise in security matters and with appropriate knowledge of ship and port operations authorized to carry out an assessment, or a verification, or an approval or a certification activity, required by the chapter or the ISPS Code.

    Some online Maritime Security Resources


    A Really Handy Guide to Ship Certification-Part 3

    Keeping vessels safe

    Cover of the Really handy Guide to Ship Certification, part 3.

    The third book of the series on vessel certification covers the SOLAS and security certificates, including SAFCON, CSSC, PSSC, ISPS and a diversion into the subject of HSSC.

    Click here for the book’s Amazon page>

     

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    What is a Declaration of Security under the ISPS Code?

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    A Quick handy guide to the ISPS Declaration of Security

    Following on from the last two posts on security related Certification is a quick look at an associated piece of documentation that may be held by a vessel.  

    The Declaration of Security is a document that  may be required for a  port visit when specific security requirements exist. The Declaration address the security requirements that could be shared between a port facility and a ship, or between ships, and states the responsibility for each.

    What determines if a Declaration of Security is required?

    A Government shall determine when a Declaration of Security is required by assessing the risk the ship/port interface or ship to ship activity poses

    A ship can request completion of a Declaration of Security when:

    • The ship is operating at a higher security level than the port facility or another ship
      it is interfacing with
    • There is an agreement on a Declaration of Security between Contracting Governments covering certain international voyages or specific ships on those
      voyages
    • There has been a security threat or a security incident involving the ship or
      involving the port facility
    • The ship is at a port which is not required to have and implement an approved port
      facility security plan
    • The ship is conducting ship to ship activities with another ship not required to have and implement an approved ship security plan

    Who completes the declaration of Security?

    • The master or the ship security officer on behalf of the ship(s); and, if appropriate,
    • The port facility security officer or, if the Contracting Government determines
      otherwise, by any other body responsible for shore-side security, on behalf of the
      port facility

    What is contained on the Declaration of Security between a ship and a port facility?

    Ship and port facilities

    • Name of Ship
    • Port of Registry
    • Certs Dec of secuityIMO Number
    • Name of Port Facility

    Summary  of actives

    • Validity dates
    • List of activities covered
    • Security level(s) for the ship
    • Security level(s) for the port facility

    Security measures  agreed between Ship and Port

    • Monitoring restricted areas to ensure that only authorized personnel have access
    • Controlling access to the port facility
    • Controlling access to the ship
    • Monitoring of the port facility including
    • berthing areas and areas surrounding the ship
    • Monitoring of the ship, including berthing areas and areas surrounding the ship
    • Handling of cargo
    • Delivery of ship’s stores
    • Handling unaccompanied baggage
    • Controlling the embarkation of persons and their effects
    • Ensuring that security communication is readily available between the ship and port facility

    Two IMO publications on the ISPS code available from Amazon

     

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    The ISPS Code- A Handy Summary

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    Following on from the last post on the International Ship Security Certificate, this post has a quick look at its associated code. 

    The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities

    Following terrorists attacks of  11th September 2001 the IMO agreed to the development of new measures relating to the security of ships and of port facilities; out of this agreement came the ISPS code

    What makes the ISPS code mandatory?

    SOLAS Chapter XI-2 , Special measures to Enhance Maritime Security

    Regulation 4 Requirements for Companies and Ships

    “2 Ships shall comply with the relevant requirements of this chapter and of part A of the ISPS Code, taking into account the guidance given in part B of the ISPS Code, and such compliance shall be verified and certified as provided for in part A of the ISPS Code…..”

    This Code applies to the following ships on international voyages:

    • Passenger ships, including high-speed passenger craft;
    • Cargo ships, including high-speed craft, of 500 gross tonnage and upwards
    • Mobile offshore drilling units
    • Port facilities serving such ships engaged on international voyages

    What does SOLAS Say about ship security and the Master’s discretion?

    Regulation 8

    “1 The master shall not be constrained by the Company, the charterer or any other person from taking or executing any decision which, in the professional judgement of the master, is necessary to maintain the safety and security of the ship. This includes denial of access to persons (except those identified as duly authorized by a Contracting Government) or their effects and refusal to load cargo, including containers or other closed cargo transport units.”

    Contents of the ISPS code

    This list of sections within the code give in an indication of the range of its requirements. The contents of sections 7, 8, 9,10, 12 and 14 are the most applicable to ships and require a Ship Security Assessment, Ship Security Plan and Ship Security officer to be in place.

    • 1 General
    • 2 Definitions
    • 3 Application
    • 4  Responsibilities of Contracting Governments
    • 5 Deceleration of Security
    • 6 Obligations of the Company
    • 7 Ship Security
    • 8 Ship Security Assessment
    • 9 Ship Security Plan
    • 10 Records
    • 11 Company Security Officer
    • 12 Ship Security Officer
    • 13 Training, Drills and exercises on Ship Security
    • 14 Port Facility Security
    • 15 Port Facility Security assessment
    • 16 Port Facility Security Plan
    • 17 Port Facility Security officer
    • 18  Training, Drills and exercises on Port Facility Security

    What is covered by the ship Security Assessment (SSA) ?

    • Physical security
    • Structural integrity
    • Personnel protection systems
    • Procedural policies
    • Radio and telecommunication systems, including computer systems and networks
    • Other areas that may, if damaged or used for illicit observation, pose a risk to
      persons, property, or operations on board the ship or within a port facility

    What is the Ship Security Plan (SSP)?

    Ship security plan means a plan developed to ensure the application of measures on board the ship designed to protect persons on board, cargo, cargo transport units, ship’s stores or the ship from the risks of a security incident.” ISPS Code definitions

    Contents of the plan

    • The organizational structure of security for the ship
    • The ship’s relationships with the Company, port facilities, other ships and relevant authorities with security responsibility
    • The communication systems to allow effective continuous communication
      within the ship and between the ship and others, including port facilities
    • The basic security measures for security level 1 that will always be in place
    • The additional security measures that will allow the ship to progress without
      delay to security level 2 and, when necessary, to security level 3
    • Procedures for regular review, or audit, of the SSP and for its amendment in response to experience or changing circumstances
    • The reporting procedures to the appropriate Contracting Governments contact points

    What are the Security Levels?

    These are set by Governments based on the security threat. Each threat level will have a corresponding series of security measures within the Ship and Port Security plans.

    • Security level 1 means the level for which minimum appropriate protective
      security measures shall be maintained at all times.
    • Security level 2 means the level for which appropriate additional protective
      security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of
      heightened risk of a security incident.
    • Security level 3 means the level for which further specific protective security
      measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a security incident
      is probable or imminent, although it may not be possible to identify the specific
      target.

    What nominated personal are required by ISPS?

    The Company Security Officer (CSO) is responsible for ensuring that a Ship Security
    Assessment (SSA) is carried out for each of the ships in the Company’s fleet.

    Ship Security Officer (SSO) means the person on board the ship, accountable to the
    master, designated by the Company as responsible for the security of the ship.

    Port Facility Security Officer (PFSO)means the person designated as responsible for the development, implementation, revision and maintenance of the port facility
    security plan and for liaison with the ship security officers and company security
    officers.


     

    Some Related Revision Guides

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    The International Ship Security Certificate- A handy guide

    Navsregss>Ship Certification>International Ship Security CertificateDSC00373

    This series of posts has to take a round turn now, to go back and explore an important certificate by-passed earlier on.  

    The ISSC- Improving security

    Why is it required?

    • The International code for the Security of Ships and of port facilities (ISPS code).
    • SOLAS chapter XI-2

    Click here for the IMO ISPS web page>

    What is contained on the Certificate?

    • Name of ship
    • Distinctive number or letters
    • Port of registry
    • Type of ship
    • Gross tonnage
    • Date of initial / renewal verification on which this certificate is basedISPS Cert format

    What does it Certify?

    • That the security system and any associated security equipment of the ship has been verified in accordance with section 19.1 of part A of the ISPS Code
    • That the verification showed that the security system and any associated security
      equipment of the ship is in all respects satisfactory and that the ship complies with the applicable requirements of chapter XI-2 of SOLAS and part A of the ISPS Code
    • That the ship is provided with an approved Ship Security Plan

    What are the survey requirements?

    The certificate is subject to Verifications rather than surveys. These verifications are to ensure that the security system and any associated security equipment of the ship fully complies with the applicable requirements of the Code, is in satisfactory condition and fit for the service for which the ship is intended.

    Verification types

    Initial verification before the ship is put in service or before the certificate
    is issued for the first time.

    Renewal verification at intervals specified by the Administration, but not
    exceeding five years.

    At least one intermediate verification. If only one intermediate verification is
    carried out it shall take place between the second and third anniversary date of the
    certificate

    A Definition

    “Ship security plan means a plan developed to ensure the application of measures
    on board the ship designed to protect persons on board, cargo, cargo transport
    units, ship’s stores or the ship from the risks of a security incident.” ISPS code

    Which vessels require an International Ship Security Certificate?

    The following types of ships engaged on international voyages:

    • Passenger ships, including high-speed passenger craft
    • Cargo ships, including high-speed craft, of 500 gross tonnage and upwards
    • Mobile offshore drilling units;

    Note the code also applies to port facilities serving such ships engaged on international voyages. Flag states and regional areas may extend this list to include additional types of vessels.

    When does the Certificate become invalid?

    • If the relevant verifications are not completed within the specified periods
    • When a Company assumes the responsibility for the operation of a ship not previously operated by that Company
    • When the vessel is transferred to the flag of another State

    Other associated Certificates

    Interim International Ship Security Certificate

    This is a temporary certificate issued for a period of no more than 6 months that allows a vessel to sail without its full International Ship Security Certificate.

    When is it issued?

    • When a ship is without a certificate, on delivery or before its entry or re-entry into service
    • When a ship is transferring flags between Governments
    • When a a ship changes ownership

    What must be verified before an Interim Certificate can be issued?

    • That the ship security assessment has been completed
    • That a  copy of the ship security plan meeting the requirements of the Code is provided on board, has been submitted for review and approval, and is being implemented on the ship
    • That he ship is provided with a ship security alert system if required,
    • That the company security officer has ensured:
      • The review of the ship security plan for compliance with the
        the Code
      • That the plan has been submitted for approval
      • That the plan is being implemented on the ship
      • That they have established the necessary arrangements, including
        drills, exercises and internal audits, through which the company security
        officer is satisfied that the ship will successfully complete the required
        verification within 6 months
      • Arrangements have been made for carrying out the required verifications
      • The master, the ship’s security officer and other personnel with security duties are familiar with their duties and responsibilities and within the ship security plan placed on board
      • These personnel  have been provided such information in the working language of the ship’s personnel or languages understood by them
    • The ship security officer meets the requirements of this Part of the Code

    Declaration of Security

    This is declaration completed by the vessel and a port for a specific period stating the security requirements and allocation of responsibilities. Such declarations are required only in certain circumstances, its detail will be covered in a later post.

    Sources of Information

    This Handy Revision guide has just been published for Kindle. The first in a new series of revision aids covering the topic of ship certification.

     

    Click here to see on Amazon>

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