Category Archives: OOW

The Safe Manning Document- A handy guide

This post series now moves on to the certificates related to manning the ship.

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The minimum needed to man the ship

What is it?

The safe manning is a document issued by the flag state that listing the numbers and qualifications required to man the ship.

Why is it needed?

It is required by SOLAS  Chapter V, Regulation 14 Ship’s manning.

“1. Contracting Governments undertake, each for its national ships, to maintain, or, if it is necessary, to adopt, measures for the purpose of ensuring that, from the point of view of safety of life at sea, all ships shall be sufficiently and efficiently manned.

2. For every ship to which chapter I applies, the administration shall:

.1 establish appropriate minimum safe manning following a transparent procedure, taking into account the relevant guidance adopted by the organization*; and

.2 issue an appropriate minimum safe manning document or equivalent as evidence of the minimum safe manning considered necessary to comply with the provisions of paragraph 1.”

The relevant UK legislation is  the Merchant Shipping (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping) Regulations 2015, SI 2015/782,

The related UK M notice is MSN 1868 (M) Standards of Training, Certification & Watchkeeping Convention: UK Requirements for Safe Manning and Watchkeeping

What does it contain?

Ships details

  • Name
  • Port of registry
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • IMO number
  • Gross tonnage
  • Main propulsion power
  • Type and trading area
  • Whether or not the machinery space is unattended and company as defined in the ISM Code

Table of personnel required

  • Numbers
  • Grades
  • Capacities
  • Any special conditions or other remarks

Limitations

  • Ship particulars
  • Service

Issue  details

  • Date of issue
  • Expiry date
  •  Signature and the seal of the Administration.

Reference: IMO  Resolution A.1047(27) Adopted on 30 November 2011 (Agenda item 9) PRINCIPLES OF MINIMUM SAFE MANNING

How is it issued?

A manning submission in submitted to the vessel’s flag state by the company giving its manning proposals. This proposals must demonstrate compliance with STCW  78 for safe manning.

How are the qualifications defined?

Through the STCW Regulation and paragraph.

Here is a table of those Regulations:

Master and deck department
Officer in charge of a navigational watch on any ship on voyages not limited to near-coastal voyages Regulation II/1, paragraph 2
Master or chief mate on a ship of 3000 GT or more Regulation II/2, paragraph 2
Master on a ship of between 500 GT and 2999 GT not engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/2, paragraph 4
Chief mate on a ship of between 500 GT and 2999 GT Regulation II/2, paragraph 4
Officer in charge of a navigational watch on a ship of less than 500 GT engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/3, paragraph 4
Master on a ship of less than 500 GT engaged on near-coastal voyages Regulation II/3, paragraph 6
Engine department
Officer in charge of an engineering watch in a manned engine-room, or designated duty engineer officer in a periodically unmanned engine-room, on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 750 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/1, paragraph 2
Chief engineer officer or second engineer officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 3000 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/2, paragraph 2
Chief engineer officer and second engineer officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of between 750 and 3000 kilowatts propulsion power Regulation III/3, paragraph 2
Electro-technical officer on a ship powered by main propulsion machinery of 750 kilowatts propulsion power or more Regulation III/6, paragraph 2

Other sources of information

UK Guidance on SOLAS chapter V

IMO Safe manning page

IMO STCW page



To learn more about ‘The Really Handy’ range of study aids for OOW, Mates and Master’s examinations- click here>

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International load line Certificate-A Handy Guide

This series continues exploring the realm of ship certification with another document that defines a vessel.

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Defining how deep a vessel can load-The Load Line Certificate

Why is it needed?

It is required by the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966

“(1) An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) shall be issued to every ship, the gross and net tonnages of which have been determined in accordance with the present Convention.”

Click here for the Treaty’s IMO page>IMO

By UK law The Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998

Explained within  UK’S MSN 1752

What ships need one?

Ships engaged on international voyages

Except:

  • Ships of war
  • Ships of less than 24 metres (79 feet) in length;
  • Pleasure yachts not engaged in trade;
    Fishing vessels.

How is it obtained?

After an initial survey before the ship is put in service, which shall include a complete inspection of its structure and equipment in so far as the ship is covered by Convention. The survey shall be such as to ensure that the arrangements, materials and scantlings fully comply with the requirements of the the International Convention on Load Lines.

How is it maintained?

By a periodical survey not exceed five years, to ensure that the structure, equipment, arrangements, materials and scantlings fully comply with the requirements of the Convention.

And an  inspection within three months either way of each annual anniversary date of the certificate, to ensure that alterations have not been made to the hull or superstructures which would affect the calculations determining the position of the load line.

What is looked during the annual inspection?

The effective condition of fittings and appliances for:

  • Protection of openings
  • Guard rails
  • Freeing ports
  • Means of access to crew’s quarters

What is contained on the certificate?

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive Number of letters
  • Port of Registry
  • Length
  • Gross Tonnage
  • Type of ship
  • Freeboards ( from deck line) and load lines assigned for:
    • Winter North Atlantic
    • Winter
    • Summmer
    • Tropical
  • Date of survey
  • Any Conditions
  • Endorsement of annual Survey
LLcert

Example of load line certificate from MSN 1752. Reproduced under Open Government Licence V3

What other document is found with the load line certificate?

The record of particulars relating to conditions of assignment.

What information is contained within the records of particulars?

Tables with details of the following (Where they apply to superstructures, exposed machinery casings and deckhouses protecting openings in freeboard and superstructure decks):

  • Doors
  • Hatchways
  • Machinery space openings
  • Ventilators
  • Air pipes
  • Cargo ports ans similar openings
  • Scuppers, inlets discharges
  • Side scuttles
  • Freeing ports
  • Protection of the crew
  • Timber deck cargo fittings
  • Other special features

Loadlines

How is the freeboard determined?

The treaty contains tables based on the length of the ship and type. These tables give the basic freeboard, which is then adjusted for several factors freeboard to give the summer freeboard. The other seasonal  freeboards are calculated based on the summer value.

 


 

 

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​The Continuous Synopsis Record-A handy guide

A permanent record of a ship’s life

What is it?

The Continuous Synopsis Record is intended to provide an on-board record of the history of the ship

Which ships need to carry one?

Ships engaged on international voyages. The CSR shall be kept on board the ship and shall be available for inspection at all times.

Why is it needed?

It is required by SOLAS Chapter XI-1 – Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Safety, Regulation 5 – Continuous Synopsis Record

What does it contain?

Ship identification

Registration details

  • The name of the State whose flag the ship is entitled to fly
  • The date on which the ship was registered with that State
  • The port at which the ship is registered
  • The date on which the ship ceased to be registered with that State.

Ownership information:

  • The name of the registered owner(s) and their registered address(es)
  • The registered owner identification number;
  • The name of the registered bareboat charterer(s) and their registered address(es), if applicable
  • The name of the Company, as defined in regulation IX/1, its registered address and the address(es) from where it carries out the safety-management activities
  • The Company identification number

Certification

  • The name of all classification society(ies) with which the ship is classed
  • The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized organization which has issued the Document of Compliance (or the Interim Document of Compliance)
  • The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized organization that has issued the Safety Management Certificate (or the Interim Safety Management Certificate)
  • The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized security organization that has issued the International Ship Security Certificate (or the Interim International Ship Security Certificate).

What form does it take?

It has three parts

  • Form 1 The CSR
  • Form 2 Amendment form
  • Form 3 Index of amendments

How is it amended

On each change a form CSR 2 is completed showing the new details. The original is kept with the CSR 1 on the ship and a copy sent to the flag state administration.

The Flag state issue a revised CSR 1 to the ship, which is given a sequential number, the initial one issued on build being 1

All the CSR1s have to be retained on board.

The CSR3 is a is updated with a summary of the amendments.

The Administration needs to keep a copy (which may be an electroniccopy) of each CSR document issued to the ship.

Reference: 
IMO Resolution A.959(23) , FORMAT AND GUIDELINES FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THE CONTINUOUS SYNOPSIS RECORD.

 

Summary

The CSR is required by SOLAS Chapter XI-1 – S

It contains a history of the ship’s life from build to scrapping

It is made up of three forms.

  • Form 1 The CSR
  • Form 2 Amendment form
  • Form 3 Index of amendments

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A new MGN 552 on RoRo cargoes- a really handy summary

The UK M Notice MGN 552 (M) has been issued by the MCA on the safe Stowage and Securing of Specialised Vehicles. It is a useful source of advise for any seafarer involved in loading Ro Ro Cargoes. This post contains a summary of that notice for those revising for examinations. If you are involved in Ro Ro operations then follow the link to read the full notice.

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The purpose of the Marine Guidance Note is to draw to the attention of industry, the potential hazards when carrying Specialised Vehicles.

Click here for the the Mnotice

Summary

Ships should ensure that cargo is stowed and secured in accordance with the approved Cargo securing manual  before the ship leaves a berth.

During the voyage, lashings should be inspected at intervals appropriate to the length of voyage and weather conditions expected to ensure that vehicles remain safely secured.

Lashings should not be released for unloading before the ship is secured at the berth, without the Master’s express permission.

Cargo should be so distributed that the ship has a metacentric height in excess of the required minimum and, whenever practicable, within an acceptable upper limit to minimise the forces acting on the cargo keeping in mind that large metacentric height could cause the ship to roll violently in adverse sea conditions.

Sudden change of course and or speed may create adverse forces acting on the ship and the cargo. This is especially relevant for vessels fitted with high lift rudders, where moderate to high rudder angles may result in high forces being generated.

The crew should be familiar with the requirements contained within the approved CSM.

Ships’ officers and managers should carry out checks on lashings during audits and inspections to ensure that bad practices are not taking place, especially where operations are rapid and very repetitive.

The condition of lashing systems should be monitored closely.

There should be an effective maintenance programme for all the portable and fixed securing devices. Web lashings are to be marked and limited to a maximum working
life.


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Top 10 MGNs Cargo work

UK M notices with a cargo work theme.

UK Marine Notices  (MGNs and MSNs) are excellent sources of information for anyone studying for Officer of Watch, Chief Mate and Master’s examinations, even for those not sailing under the British flag. Here are the top ten of the Notices with a cargo work theme.

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1. MGN 107 (M) – The Merchant Shipping (Carriage of Cargoes) Regulations 1999.

The new Regulations introduce additional requirements with respect to the loading and unloading of bulk cargoes.

2. MGN 146 (M) – The Carriage of Packaged Cargo and Cargo Units. Requirement for cargo securing manual.

3. MGN 198 (M) – Safety at Solid Bulk Cargo Terminals

4.   MGN 418 Roll-on/roll-off ships stowage and securing of vehicles.

5. MGN 60 (M) – Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC Code): 1996 Amendment – Carriage of Coal Cargoes.

6. MGN 157 (M) -Safety of Personnel During Container Securing Operations and while Working at Corrugated Bulkheads in General Cargo Ships.

7. MGN 282 (M) – Dangerous Goods: Guidance in the Carriage of Packaged Dangerous Goods on Offshore Supply Vessels.

8. MGN 531 (M) – Cargo Stowage and Securing: Code of Safe Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing (CSS Code) – Guidance on Application of Section 6 of Annex 14 for Existing Containerships.

9. MSN 1231 (M) – Safe Cargo-Handling Operations on Offshore Supply Vessels.

10    MSN 1167 (M+F) – Carriage of Containers and Flats in Ships not Designed or Modified for the Purpose.

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Top 10 M notices-LSA equipment

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UK Marine Notices  (MGNs and MSNs) are excellent sources of information for anyone studying for Officer of Watch, Chief Mate and Master’s examinations, even for those not sailing under the British flag. Here are the top ten of the Notices covering the subject of lifesaving equipment. Lifeboats have been covered in the previous post.

1. MGN 343 (M+F)– Hydrostatic Release Units (HRU) – Stowage and Float Free Arrangements for Inflatable Liferafts

2. MGN 79 (M+F) – Safety Equipment and Pollution Prevention Equipment Carried in Excess of Statutory Requirements

3. MGN 499 (M+F)
– Life-Saving Appliances: Inflatable Liferafts, Marine Evacuation Systems, Inflatable Lifejackets and Hydrostatic Release Units: Servicing Requirements

4. MGN 529 (M+F)– Life-Saving Appliances – Immersion Suits Acceptance Criteria for Airtight Packaging

5. MGN 76 (M) – Lifejackets carried on Passenger Ships

6. MGN 254 (M+F) – Guidance to Users of Inflatable

 
7.  MGN 419 (M+F) – Disposal of Out of Date Pyrotechnics (Marine Flares)

8. MGN 105 (M+F) – Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Material on Life-Saving Appliances

9. MGN 344 (M) – Observations and Recommendations arising from a Series of Domestic Passenger Vessel Evacuation Exercises

10. MGN 106 (M+F) – Natural & Synthetic Fibre Cordage for Lifesaving Appliances

To learn more about ‘The Really Handy’ range of study aids for OOW examinations- click here>
 

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Top ten MGNs for officer of the watches

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UK Marine Guidance Notices  (MGNs) are excellent sources of information for anyone studying for Officer of Watch examinations, even for those not sailing under the British flag. Here are the top ten of the Notices covering OOW topics.

Follow the links to read the notice.

The top ten UK Marine Guidence notes for the officer of the watch.  (Feb 2016)

1 MGN 315 (M) – Keeping a Safe Navigational Watch on Merchant Vessels

2 MGN 369 (M+F) – Navigation: Navigation in Restricted Visibility

3 MGN 379 (M+F) – Navigation: Use of Electronic Navigation Aids

4 MGN 137 (M+F) – Look-out During Periods of Darkness and Restricted Visibility

5 MGN 357 (M+F) – Night-time lookout – Photochromic Lenses and Dark Adaptation

6 MGN 199 (M) – Dangers of interaction

7 MGN 299 (M+F) – Interference with Safe Navigation through Inappropriate Use of Mobile Phones

8 MGN 372 (M+F) – Offshore Renewable Energy Installations (OREIs): Guidance to Mariners Operating in the Vicinity of UK OREIs

9 MGN 364 (M+F) – Navigation: Traffic Separation Schemes – Application of Rule 10 and Navigation in the Dover Strait

10 MGN 301 (M+F) – Manoeuvring Information on Board Ships

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