Tag Archives: MARPOL

The Maritime Conventions

dscf3338SOLAS, MARPOL and beyond

A Handy Revision Guide to the Conventions

Throughout this series of posts on Ship Certification various International Conventions have often been referred to. Therefore this is good time to create a summary of the the Key conventions.  To keep things simple, I have ordered and categorised them in the same manner as the certification posts.

The IMO conventions

The majority of the conventions, but not all, are produced by the IMO.

Identifying the ship

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United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)     

United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982

“The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea lays down a comprehensive regime of law and order in the world’s oceans and seas establishing rules governing all uses of the oceans and their resources. It enshrines the notion that all problems of ocean space are closely interrelated and need to be addressed as a whole.”

The issues covered by the Convention include:

  • Territorial seas
  • Innocent passage
  • Transit passage through straits
  • Exclusive economic zones  (EEZ)
  • Continental shelf exploitation
  • Freedoms of the high sea
  • Marine pollution responsibilities
  • Disputes

The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea

The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea is an independent judicial body established by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea to adjudicate disputes arising out of the interpretation and application of the Convention.

Defining the shipwpid-wp-1437630402998.jpeg

International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969 (Tonnage Convention)

This Convention introduced an universal tonnage measurement system. The Convention provides for gross and net tonnages, both of which are calculated independently.

Gross tonnage and net tonnage

The Convention meant a transition from the traditionally used terms gross register tons (grt) and net register tons (nrt) to gross tonnage(GT) and net tonnage (NT).

Some definitions from the Convention

“(4) “gross tonnage” means the measure of the overall size of a ship determined in accordance with the provisions of the present Convention;

(5) “net tonnage” means the measure of the useful capacity of a ship determined in accordance with the provisions of the present Convention;”

International Convention on Load Lines, 1966, as Loadlinesmodified by the 1988 Protocol relating thereto, as amended (Load Lines Convention)

“It has long been recognized that limitations on the draught to which a ship may be loaded make a significant contribution to her safety. These limits are given in the form of freeboards, which constitute, besides external weathertight and watertight integrity, the main objective of the Convention.” IMO website

Contents of the convention

Annex I

  • Chapter I – General
  • Chapter II – Conditions of assignment of freeboard
  • Chapter III – Freeboards
  • Chapter IV – Special requirements for ships assigned timber freeboards

Annex II covers Zones, areas and seasonal periods

Annex III contains certificates, including the International Load Line Certificate

Managing the vessel

The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certificationwpid-157765645208.jpg
and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978

International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers entered into force in 1984. The main purpose of the Convention is to promote safety of life and property at sea and the protection of the marine environment by establishing in common agreement international standards of training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers.

The Manila amendments to the STCW Convention and Code were adopted on 25 June 2010, marking a major revision of the STCW Convention and Code.

The STCW regulations are supported by sections by the STCW Code. The Convention contains basic requirements which are then enlarged upon and explained in the Code.

Part A of the Code is mandatory. The minimum standards of competence required for seagoing personnel are given in detail in a series of tables.

Part B of the Code contains recommended guidance which is intended to help implement the Convention.

ILO Maritime Labour Convention, (MLC 2006) – As amended by the 2014DSCF3260 Amendment (MLC)

The Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 (“MLC, 2006”) establishes minimum working and living standards for all seafarers working on ships flying the flags of ratifying countries. It is widely known as the “seafarers’ bill of rights,”

The convention is an international labour Convention adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Keeping the ship safe

The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974img_20151119_111728.jpg

“The SOLAS Convention in its successive forms is generally regarded as the most important of all international treaties concerning the safety of merchant ships. The first version was adopted in 1914, in response to the Titanic disaster, the second in 1929, the third in 1948, and the fourth in 1960. The 1974 version includes the tacit acceptance procedure – which provides that an amendment shall enter into force on a specified date unless, before that date, objections to the amendment are received from an agreed number of Parties.” IMO Website

The 1974 Convention has been updated and amended on numerous occasions. The Convention in force today is sometimes referred to as SOLAS, 1974, as amended.

Keeping the seas clean

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from wpid-10152154002370209.jpgShips, 1973 (MARPOL)

MARPOL is the main international convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational or accidental causes.

The MARPOL Convention was adopted on 2 November 1973 at IMO.  MARPOL has been updated by amendments over the years.

The convention currently includes six technical Annexes.

International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention)aquariamcircleedited

The Convention aims to prevent, minimize and ultimately eliminate the transfer of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens through the control and management of ships’ ballast water and sediments. It enters into force on 8 September 2017.

Under the Convention, all ships in international traffic are required to manage their ballast water and sediments to a certain standard, according to a ship-specific ballast water management plan. All ships will also have to carry a ballast water record book and an international ballast water management certificate.

International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships, 2001 (AFS Convention)

The Convention prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints used on ships and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems.

Annex I of the Convention states that all ships shall not apply or re-apply organotins compounds which act as biocides in anti-fouling systems.

International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage, 2001 (Bunkers Convention)

The Convention was adopted to ensure that adequate, prompt, and effective compensation is available to persons who suffer damage caused by spills of oil, when carried as fuel in ships’ bunkers

International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1992 (CLC Convention)

The Convention covers those who suffer oil pollution damage resulting from maritime casualties involving oil-carrying ships. The Convention places the liability for such damage on the owner of the ship from which the polluting oil escaped or was discharged.

The Convention applies to seagoing vessels carrying oil in bulk as cargo, but only ships carrying more than 2,000 tons of oil are required to maintain insurance in respect of oil pollution damage.

Other Conventions

Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREGs)

The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009caribillemillnarrow

The Hong Kong Convention is aimed at ensuring that ships, when being recycled after reaching the end of their operational lives, do not pose any unnecessary risk to human health and safety or to the environment.

Its regulations cover:

  • The design, construction, operation and preparation of ships so as to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling
  • The operation of ship recycling facilities in a safe and environmentally sound manner
  • The establishment of an appropriate enforcement mechanism for ship recycling, incorporating certification and reporting requirements

Ships to be sent for recycling will be required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, which will be specific to each ship.

International Convention on Salvage

The Convention replaced the 1910 convention on the law of salvage which incorporated the “‘no cure, no pay” principle. The 1989 Convention added a provision for an enhanced salvage award taking into account the skill and efforts of the salvors in preventing or minimizing damage to the environment.

International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR)

The 1979 Convention was aimed at developing an international SAR plan, so that, no matter where an accident occurs, the rescue of persons in distress at sea will be co-ordinated by a SAR organization and, when necessary, by co-operation between neighbouring SAR organizations.

As this series on Certification  draws to a close this post will no doubt be ‘tweaked’ and expanded, and may form the basis of its own page on spawn more pots….maybe. Meanwhile the next certificate is awaiting exploring.


For Information about the Really Handy Range of Revision Books for Mariners, Click here>

 A Really Handy Guide to Ship Certification (part 1) has just been added to the range. More to follow shortly in the series.

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Engine International air pollution prevention Certificate-A Handy Guide

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The EIAPP- Certifying the engines

The last two posts in this series covered certificates that are concerned with reducing air pollution from a ship, this post delves deeper into the subject by considering reducing pollution from individual diesel engines.

What is the EIAPP Certificate?

It is the Engine International air pollution prevention Certificate. It is a certificate issued for a marine diesel engine. The EIAPP Certificate shall accompany the engine throughout its life and shall be available on board the ship at all times.

Why is an EIAPP required?

It is required by Technical Code on Control of Emission of Nitrogen Oxides from Marine Diesel Engines made mandatory by Annex VI of MARPOL.

Which engines require an EIAPP?

  • Eac
  • h marine diesel engine with a power output of more than 130 kW installed on a ship
  • Each marine diesel engine with a power output of more than 130 kW which undergoes a major conversion on or after 1 January 2000 except when demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Administration that such engine is an identical replacement to the engine which it is replacing.

The following engines do not require an EIAPP

  • A diesel engine intended to be used solely for emergencies, or solely to power any device or equipment intended to be used solely for emergencies on the ship on which it is installed
  • A marine diesel engine installed in lifeboats intended to be used solely for emergencies
  • A marine diesel engine installed on a ship solely engaged in voyages within waters subject to the sovereignty or jurisdiction of the State the flag of which the ship is entitled to fly, provided that such engine is subject to an alternative NOx control measure established by the Administration

What does the EIAPP certify?

That a marine diesel engine has been surveyed for pre-certification in accordance with the requirements of the revised Technical Code on Control of Emission of Nitrogen Oxides.

That the pre-certification survey shows that the engine, its components, adjustable features, and Technical File, prior to the engine’s installation and/or service on board a ship, fully comply with the applicable regulation 13 of Annex VI of MARPOL.

How long is an EIAPP valid?

For the life of the engine subject to surveys in accordance with regulation 5 of Annex VI of the Convention.

What information is contained on the EIAPP Certificate?

The certificate contains a table with the following headings

  • Engine
  • Manufacturer
  • Model number
  • Serial number
  • Test cycle(s)
  • Rated power (kW) and speed (RPM)
  • Engine approval number

What document must be attached to the EIAPP?

The Supplement to engine international air pollution prevention certificate.

The Supplement to engine international air pollution prevention certificate 

This documents full name is the ‘Record of construction, technical file and means of verification supplement to the engine international air pollution prevention certificate (EIAPP Certificate)’.

The Record and its attachments shall be permanently attached to the EIAPP Certificate.

What Sections does the record contain?

  • Particulars of the technical file
  • Particulars of the engine
  • Specifications for the on-board NOx verification procedures for the engine parameter survey

What Particulars of the technical file are recorded?

  • Technical File identification/approval number
  • Technical File approval date

What Particulars of the engine are recorded?

  • Name and address of manufacturer
  • Place of engine build
  • Date of engine build
  • Place of pre-certification survey
  • Date of pre-certification survey
  • Engine type and model number
  • Engine serial number
  • If applicable, engine group details.
  • Approval reference
  • Rated power (kW) and rated speed (rpm) values or ranges
  • Test cycle(s)
  • Parent Engine(s) test fuel oil specification
  • Applicable NOx emission limit (g/kWh
  • Parent Engine(s) emission value (g/kWh)

What Specifications for the on-board NOx verification procedures for the engine parameter survey are contained?

  • Engine Parameter Check method:
    • Identification/approval number
    • Approval date
  • Direct Measurement and Monitoring method:
    • Identification/approval number
    • Approval date

What additional document must always accompany an engine?

The Technical File as required by chapter 2 of the NO x Technical Code, must always accompany an engine throughout its life and always be available on board a ship. It forms an integral part of the EAIPP certification.

With this EIAPP post the subject of air pollution certification is completed, to clarify the variety of certification involved here is the three key pieces of documentation required to proved compliance with MARPOL Annex VI

For the Really Handy Range of Revision Books-Click here>

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International Energy Efficiency (IEE) Certificate

 

A handy revision guide to the International Energy Efficiency (IEE) Certificate

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Saving fuel to save the environment

This certificate forms the second aspect of reducing air pollution, that is reducing fuel consumption.

Why is it required?

It is required by regulation 5.4 of Annex VI of MARPOL.

What information is contained on the certificate?

Particulars of ship

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • IMO Number

Dates of Survey

What does it certify?

That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with regulation 5.4 of Annex VI of the Convention; and That the survey shows that the ship complies with the applicable requirements in regulation 20, regulation 21 and regulation 22.

What must be attached to the certificate?

Supplement to the International Energy Efficiency Certificate, a Record of construction relating to energy efficiency.

Supplement to the International Energy Efficiency Certificate

A Record of construction relating to energy efficiency.

What is contained in the supplement?

Particulars of ship

  • Name of ship
  • IMO number
  • Date of building contract
  • Gross tonnage
  • Deadweight
  • Type of ship

Propulsion system

  • Diesel propulsion
  • Diesel-electric propulsion
  • Turbine propulsion
  • Hybrid propulsion
  • Propulsion system other than any of the above

Attained Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI)

The Attained EEDI is:     grams-CO2/tonne-mile

A statement on why the Attained EEDI is not calculated:

  • The ship is exempt under regulation 20.1 as it is not a new ship as defined in regulation  2.23
  • The type of propulsion system is exempt in accordance with regulation 19.3
  • The requirement of regulation 20 is waived by the ship’s Administration in accordance with regulation 19.4
  • The type of ship is exempt in accordance with regulation 20.1

Required EEDI

  • Required EEDI is:       grams-CO2/tonne-mile
  • Or a statement on why the  EEDI is not applicable as:
    • The ship is exempt under regulation 21.1 as it is not a new ship as defined in regulation 2.23
    • The type of propulsion system is exempt in accordance with regulation 19.3
    • The requirement of regulation 21 is waived by the ship’s Administration in accordance with regulation 19.4
    • The type of ship is exempt in accordance with regulation 21.1
    • The ship’s capacity is below the minimum capacity threshold in Table 1 of regulation 21.1

Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan

A statement that the ship is provided with a Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) in compliance with regulation 22

Click here for MEPC.213(63) Guidelines for development of the Energy Efficiency Management Plan

EEDI technical file

  • A statement that the IEE Certificate is accompanied by the EEDI technical file in compliance with regulation 20.1
  •  The EEDI technical file identification/verification number
  • The EEDI technical file verification date

What is a technical file?

A Technical File is a record containing all details of parameters, including component and settings of an engine, which may influence the NOx emission of the engine, in accordance with 2.4 of the NOx TECHNICAL CODE (2008).

Click here for the IMO web pages on measures to prevent air pollution>

What is EEDI?

Energy Efficiency Design Index, a specific figure for an individual ship design, expressed in grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per ship’s capacity-mile (the smaller the EEDI the more energy efficient ship design) and is calculated by a formula based on the technical design parameters for a given ship.

Click here for MEPC.212(63) Guidelines on the method of calculation of EEDI>

Click here for UK MGN 462 Entry into force of the Energy Efficiency Design Index>

Click here for UK guidance to Surveyors MSIS 23 Chapter 17>

Click here for UK MSN 1818 Prevention of air pollution from ships>


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International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate

Here is the first of two ship certificates associated the last Annex of MARPOL; an annex  that aims to reduce pollution of the air above vessels.

For those visiting this blog for the first time, here is a link of where to find information about ship certification on other websites.

A Handy Revision Guide

IAPPC keeping the air clean

This is the final part of environmental protection contained within MARPOL. Clean air is the topic of Annex VI of the Convention.

 Click here for the IMO page on air pollution>

Why is the certificate required?


Regulation 5 of Annex VI of MARPOL.


Which ships must carry the certificate?

Every ship of 400 gross tonnage and above.

What emissions are covered by the certificate?

  • Ozone depleting substances 
  • Nitrogen oxides 
  • Sulphur oxides (SOx) and particulates
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • Shipboard incineration 

 What Surveys are required?

  • An initial survey
  • A renewal survey at intervals not exceeding five years
  • An intermediate survey
  • An annual survey
  • An additional survey

What information in contained on the certificate?

Particulars of ship

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • IMO Number
  • A statement that the survey shows that the equipment, systems, fittings, arrangements and materials fully comply with the applicable requirements of Annex VI of MARPOL
  • Completion date of survey on which the Certificate is based

The Supplement to the IAPP certificate

This must be attached to the Certificate, and contains sections on:

1 Particulars of ship


2 Control of emissions from ships

2.1 Ozone depleting substances (regulation 12)

This includes a system list


2.2 Nitrogen oxides (NOx) (regulation 13)

This includes atable of marine diesel engines with their tiers


2.3 Sulphur oxides (SOx) and particulate matter (regulation 14)

2.4 Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (regulation 15)

This includes details of any Vapour collection system and the  VOC plan


2.5 Shipboard incineration (regulation 16)

2.6 Equivalents (regulation 4)


What record book is required to be kept?

Each ship  which has rechargeable systems that contain ozone depleting substances shall maintain an Ozone Depleting Substances Record Book.

What engines are require compliance with the NOX regulations?

Marine diesel engines with a power output of more than 130 kW installed on a ship, but does apply to  diesel engine intended to be used solely for emergencies, or solely to power any device or equipment intended to be used solely for emergencies on the ship on which it is installed, or installed on the ship’s lifeboats.


What is the tier of an engine?


The ‘Tier’ is the NOX weight per per KWH and is dependent on the date of construction of a ship  and its operating area


  • Tier I   2000-2011
  • Tier II 2011 after
  • Tier III in an emission control area 

 Click here for the IMO page on NOX emissions>

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Click here for the IMO page on Emmision Control areas>

Some handy links

MSN 1819 Prevention of air pollution from ships

MGN 386 Survey and Certification Requirements for the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) Regulations 2008 – Additional Guidance  

 US EPA guidelines

European Commision webpage on marine air pollution

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​The international Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate- A handy revision guide

The international Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate

Keeping the coastal seas clean

It is back to the environmental relatated certificates again after the diversion into HSSC.  So far oil and noxious liquids have been covered, both with their own Annex within MARPOL, and this post’s topic also has its own Annex, Sewage.

Why is it required?

It is required by MARPOL Annex IV- Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Sewage from Ships

What is sewage?

Sewage means:

” .1 drainage and other wastes from any form of toilets and urinals;

 .2 drainage from medical premises (dispensary, sick bay, etc.) via wash basins, wash tubs and scuppers located in such premises;

 .3 drainage from spaces containing living animals; or

 .4 other waste waters when mixed with the drainages defined above.”

MARPOL Annex IV Regulation 1 – Definitions

What ships require the certificate?

Ships engaged in international voyages that are  400 gross tonnage and above orf less than 400 gross tonnage which are certified to carry more than 15 persons.

How long does the certificate last?

For a period specified by the Administration which shall not exceed five years.

When the renewal survey is completed within three months before the expiry date of the existing Certificate, the new Certificate shall be valid from the date of completion of the renewal survey to a date not exceeding five years from the date of expiry of the existing Certificate.

When the renewal survey is completed after the expiry date of the existing Certificate, the new Certificate shall be valid from the date of completion of the renewal survey to a date not exceeding five years from the date of expiry of the existing Certificate.

What equipment is covered by the certificate?

Sewage  treatment  plant

Comminuter

Holding  tank

Shore discharge pipeline and connection

What is shown on the certificate?

Ship details

  • Name of  ship
  • Distinctive number or  letters 
  • Port of registry 
  • Gross tonnage 
  • Number of persons which the ship is certified to carry 
  • IMO  Number 
  • New/existing  ship
  • Build date

Equipment details
Description  of  the  sewage  treatment  plant: 

  • Type  of  sewage  treatment  plant
  • Name of manufacturer 

 Description of  comminuter: 

  • Type  of comminuter 
  •  Name of  manufacturer 
  • Standard of  sewage  after  disinfection 

Description of  holding  tank: 

  • Total capacity  of the  holding  tank 
  • Location 

 A pipeline  for  the discharge  of sewage  to a  reception facility,  fitted with a standard shore connection. 

Survey details

Completion date  of  survey  on which this Certificate is based

“Regulation 9 – Sewage Systems

1 Every ship which, in accordance with regulation 2, is required to comply with the provisions of this Annex shall be equipped with one of the following sewage systems:

  .1 a sewage treatment plant which shall be of a type approved by the Administration, taking into account the standards and test methods developed by the Organization,1 or

  .2 a sewage comminuting and disinfecting system approved by the Administration. Such system shall be fitted with facilities to the satisfaction of the Administration, for the temporary storage of sewage when the ship is less than 3 nautical miles from the nearest land, or

  .3 a holding tank of the capacity to the satisfaction of the Administration for the retention of all sewage, having regard to the operation of the ship, the number of persons on board and other relevant factors. The holding tank shall be constructed to the satisfaction of the Administration and shall have a means to indicate visually the amount of its contents.”

MARPOL Annex IV

Note: A Comminutors are used to reduce the particle size of wastewater solids. 

What does it certify? 

That the  ship is equipped with a sewage  treatment  plant/comminuter/ holding  tank  and a discharge  pipeline in  compliance  with regulations 9 and 10 of  Annex  IV of MARPOL.

That the  ship has been surveyed in accordance  with regulation 4 of Annex  IV  of MARPOL.

That the  survey  shows that the  structure,  equipment, systems, fittings,  arrangements and material of the  ship and the  condition thereof  are  in all respects satisfactory  and that the ship complies with the applicable requirements of Annex IV of MARPOL.

What Surveys are required?

An initial survey before the ship is put in service or before the Certificate is issued for the first time

 A renewal survey  not exceeding five years

 An additional survey after any important repairs or renewals are made. 

Some useful links

IMO webpage on MARPOL sewage Annexe 

UK MGN 385 – prevention of pollution by sewage and garbage from ships 

UK MSN 1807 prevention of pollution by sewage and garbage from ships 

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​International pollution prevention certificate for the carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk- A handy guide

wpid-wp-1438103199200.jpegThe NLS certificate- Carrying chemicals

This blog now returns to exploring the environmental themed certificates with a document related to carrying chemicals in bulk. 

Why is it required?

It is required by MARPOL Annex II marpol

What does it certify?

  • That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with regulation 8 of Annex II of MARPOL
  • That the survey showed that the structure, equipment, systems, fitting, arrangements and material of the ship and the condition thereof are in all respects satisfactory and that the ship complies with the applicable requirements of Annex II of MARPOL
  • That the ship has been provided with a Procedures and Arrangements Manual as required by regulation 14 of Annex II of MAROL and that the arrangements and equipment of the ship prescribed in the Manual are in all respects satisfactory.
  • That the ship complies with the requirements of Annex II to MARPOL 73/78 for the carriage in bulk of  liquid substances listed on the certificate.

What information is shown on the certificate?

  • Particulars of ship
  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • IMO Number
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • A table with the headings :
    • Noxious Liquid substances
    • Conditions of carriage,  (Tank numbers etc)
    • Pollution category

The NLS Certificate shall be at least in English, French or Spanish.

What are the survey requirements to maintain the certificate?

An initial survey before the ship is put in service or before the Certificate required  is issued for the first time. and which shall include a complete survey of its structure, equipment, systems, fittings, arrangements  to ensure  they  fully comply with the requirements of Annex. II

A renewal survey
at intervals  not exceeding 5 years. The renewal survey shall be such as to ensure that the structure, equipment, systems, fittings, arrangements and material fully comply with applicable requirements of the Annex.

An intermediate survey within 3 months before or after the second anniversary date or within 3 months before or after the third anniversary date of the Certificate. The intermediate survey shall be such as to ensure that the equipment and associated pump and piping systems fully comply with the applicable requirements of this Annex and are in good working order.

An annual survey within 3 months before or after each anniversary date of the Certificate including a general inspection of the structure, equipment, systems, fittings, arrangements and material  to ensure that they have been maintained  and that they remain satisfactory for the service for which the ship is intended.

 An additional survey whenever any important repairs or renewals are made. The survey shall be such as to ensure that the necessary repairs or renewals have been effectively made, that the material and workmanship of such repairs or renewals are in all respects satisfactory and that the ship complies in all respects with the requirements of the Annex

What other documents are required?

  • Cargo Record Book for Ships Carrying Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk
  • Procedures and Arrangements Manual

What other International Regulations cover the carriage of chemicals in bulk?

Carriage of chemicals in bulk is covered by regulations in SOLAS Chapter VII – Carriage of dangerous goods

This requires compliance with the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Shipibccodes carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code)

Click here for the IMO page on the IBC code>

 

What are the pollution categories?

Category X: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a major hazard to either marine resources or human health and, therefore, justify the prohibition of the discharge into the marine environment.marinepollutant

Category Y: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a hazard to either marine resources or human health or cause harm to amenities or other legitimate uses of the sea and therefore justify a limitation on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment.

Category Z: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a minor hazard to either marine resources or human health and therefore justify less stringent restrictions on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment.

Note:  Noxious liquid substance means any substance indicated in the Pollution Category column of chapter 17 or 18 of the International Bulk Chemical Code or provisionally assessed under the provisions of regulation 6.3 as falling into category X, Y or Z.

Useful links

Click here for UK guidance on pollution prevention>

Click here for UK guidance for Surveyors on Annex II>

Click here for the text of MARPOL Annex II as contained in MEPEC 118 (52)>



Click here for the Kindle Really Handy Books range>

 

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Supplement to the International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate-A handy guide

Supplement to the IOPPThe equipment listed

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These Records will be permanently attached to the IOPP Certificate and form a useful guide to the scope of an IOPP survey. This post lists the main headings of the supplement and gives the relevant MARPOL annex 1 reference.

Two formats for this supplement exist:

  • FORM A-Record of Construction and equipment for ships other than oil tankers
  • FORM B- Record of Construction and equipment for oil tankers

Click here for a USCG example of the forms>

FORM A-Record of Construction and equipment for ships other than oil tankers

  •  Particulars of ship
  • Equipment for the control of oil discharge from machinery space bilges and oil fuel tanks(MARPOL regulations 16 and 14)
  •  Means for retention and disposal of oil residues (sludge) (MARPOL regulation 12) and oily bilge water holding tank(s)
  • Standard discharge connection( MARPOL regulation 13)
  •  Shipboard oil/marine pollution emergency plan (MARPOL regulation 37)
  •  Equivalents (MARPOL regulation 5)

FORM B- Record of Construction and equipment for oil tankers

  • Particulars of ship
  • Equipment for the control of oil discharge from machinery space bilges and oil fuel tanks (MARPOL regulations 16 and 14)
  •  Means for retention and disposal of oil residues (sludge) (MARPOL regulation 12) and oily bilge water holding tank(s)
  • Standard Discharge connection (MARPOL regulation 13)
  •  Construction (MARPOL regulations 18, 19, 20, 23, 26, 27 and 28)
  • Segregated Ballast
  • Double hull and double bottoms
  • Accidental outflow protection
  • Limitations of size and arrangements of cargo tanks
  • Intact stability
  • Subdivision and damage stability
  • Crude oil washing
  • Retention of oil on board (MARPOL regulations 29, 31 and 32)
  •  Pumping, piping and discharge arrangements (MARPOL regulation 30)
  •  Shipboard oil/marine pollution emergency plan (MARPOL regulation 37)
  •  Ship-to-ship oil transfer operations at sea (MARPOL regulation 41)
  • Exemptions
  • Equivalents (MARPOL regulation 5)

For some useful guidance see:  UK MCA guidance on survey and certification (MSIS 23)

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The International Oil Pollution Certificate- A handy guide

gormeytanker

This is the first of the environmental related certificates to be covered in this series of posts on ship certification.

IOPP- Keeping oil out of the water

Why is it required?

It is required by MARPOL Annex 1- Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by oil, Regulation 6.

Click here for the IMO MARPOL page>australiangov

Click here for a copy of the text from the Australian goverment website>

The UK regulations are stated in SI 1996 No. 2154, The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Oil Pollution) Regulations 1996.

Which ships require an IOPP?

Oil tankers of 150 GT and above and other ships of 400 GT and above

“Oil tanker means a ship constructed or adapted primarily to carry oil in bulk in its cargo spaces and includes combination carriers, any ”NLS tanker” as defined in Annex II of the present convention, and any gas carrier as defined in regulation 3.20 of chapter II-1 of SOLAS 74 (as Amended), when carrying a cargo or part cargo of oil in bulk” MARPOL Regulation 1

What surveys are required?

  • Initial survey
  • Renewal survey every 5 years
  • Intermediate survey not earlier than six months before and not later than six months after the half-way date of the period of validity of the Certificate
  • Annual survey within 3 months before or after each anniversary date of the Certificate

What must the certificate be supplemented by?

A  Record of Construction and Equipment

What is contained on the certificate?

Particulars of ship

  • Name of ship
  • Distinctive number or letters
  • Port of registry
  • Gross tonnage
  • Deadweight of the ship
  • IMO Number

Type of ship:

  • Oil tanker
  • Ship other than an oil tanker

gormleytankerstern

What does the certificate signify?

That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with regulation 6 of Annex I of the Convention.

That the survey shows that the structure, equipment, systems, fittings, arrangement and material of the ship and the condition thereof are in all respects satisfactory and that the ship complies with the applicable requirements of Annex I of the Convention.

The next post will cover the two supplementry documents to the IOPP, documents that give an excellent indication on what areas of a ship will be inspected a during an IOPP survey.


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MARPOL- a quick guide to the Annexes

wpid-10152154002370209.jpgProtecting the marine environment

MARPOL

Before this blog continues with the certification related to environmental protection, it will pause to put the certification in context by listing the parts of MARPOL and naming the related certificates.

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) is the main international convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational or accidental causes. Each of its annexes contains the regulations for specific potential sources of pollution.

Annex I– Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by oil

 Annex II– Regulations for the Control of Pollution by Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk

Annex III– Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Harmful Substances Carried by sea in Packaged form

Annex IV– Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Sewage from Ships

Annex V-Regulation for the Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships

Annex VI– Regulations for the Prevention of Air pollution from ships

 Click here for IMO information on MARPOL>

Click here for MARPOL information from the US coast guard>

Two other environmental conventions

International convention for the control and management of ship’s ballast water and sediments, 2004 in force 8th September 2017

International convention on the control of harmful anti-fouling systems on ships, 2001

  • International Anti-fouling System Certificate

Click here for IMO information on the convention>


Click here for information about the Really Handy Revision guides>

 

 

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